r/engineering is **NOT** for students to ask for guidance on selecting their major, or for homework / project help. I've been told time and time again that if you were to pursue this career, a bachelors is as far as you need to go as it is the most efficient route to take in life. The Masters of Science in Engineering degree is completed in three semesters and costs non-resident students $17,384.25 per semester (2019-2020).

Feeling quite good about it, doing a master allows me to learn the stuff I'm more interested in and which wasn't covered that much in my bachelors. TL;DR - It's probably not worth it.

I'm not sure pf the difference as far as career marketability, but an ME is typically a 'terminal degree' meaning there is no possibility of perusing a PhD after completion. It gets completed in a year. Questions about current engineering projects you are working on, how to interpret codes and standards, and industry practice are all encouraged. It's hard to hurt yourself with more degrees; however, you can narrow your versatility -- I've been told I'm over qualified for a job, which can be infuriating. Unless you want to go into teaching or directly into R&D (which is transitioning towards more MS degrees than PhDs in some fields), I wouldn't go to college expecting to go to graduate school. Even outside of true research. To me, thats very exhilarating.

Thanks for your input though.

Remember that typically a masters in engineering is good for mid career differentiation.

No pumps can be used at the TOP END, so the liquid has to be sucked out somehow really.

Yes, specialized in thermal and fluid science and then became a CFD Analyst, and had that job offer in the last semester of the MSME. Hmm, now that is an interesting word there, "prefer". An example of this can be practicing engineering professionals who are adjunct professors at the university or universities that invite specific engineering companies to recruit students. A masters is starting to be the norm for entry level Structural Engineering jobs. Having been in industry 6 years now (mechanical engineer), I feel like masters degree is roughly equal to a year of work experience. If you go to a good school, you will be in a class with some of the best future engineers in the world learning a deep understanding of engineering fundamentals.

I'm the one people look at when they model a piece decide we should make it with material A, I tell them if its even feasible.

That's a main point that has left me skeptical. Edit: I would just like to add, people have also stated that you can get years of work experience in the field as opposed to finishing your masters degree with no experience at all. r/engineering is **NOT** for students to ask for guidance on selecting their major, or for homework / project help. As for how the masters helped me (presumably you mean vs a bachelor's), I was hired on as a direct hire (not contract/temp-to-perm) with title of Engineer II and a pretty decent salary for the area (this with me having no engineering work experience other …

I spent 18 months delivering pizza after graduation. I'm a bit stumped really and don't know much hydraulics. How has your job benefited with you having a masters? That's my take.

I get to work with REALLY cool things and talk to lots of talented people. Definitely evaluate your options at the end of your BS, and move on from there.

On the flip side, the job offer I got and took was for a level II position when someone entering with bachelors starts at a level I position and has to wait 4 years to move up. I wasn't sure where I would end up so I waited until I got the job I desired in structural engineering. Studied Aerospace, ended up in Automotive. Tl;dr Master's gives you more flexibility in your career choices, provides valuable experience and makes you stand out in the application process. When I started in my most recent job there hadn't been any CFD performed, and nobody there who had knowledge of the field. Having no work experience is a bitch, Master's or no. It's almost necessary for BME and helped me a lot, but I think good internship experience was more valuable. Some companies might up the pay a little or lower the experience requirement but you would have gotten further in your career just getting the bachelors. We had MS holders who would occasionally be able to talk their way into an Engineer 2 position (starting), rather than an E1 position, but there were also MS holders who started as E1. I believe engineer firms are most interested in highering young engineers for their engineering input developed from there undergraduate and graduate programs along with their ability to be trained as future professionals in the industry. So those are the problems i'm finding for myself. BS in Civil Engineering, MS in Structural Engineering, and now working at a Structural Engineering firm. I think a major point is being missed here.

Let's put aside the knowledge side of thing for now but I agree you will learn more in industry then another year in Uni. While I also am a little older, and have a really solid resume, I think it's fair to say a lot of the difference can be ascribed to my graduate degree. It is a lot more complicated if you do not.

r/engineering is **NOT** for students to ask for guidance on selecting their major, or for homework / project help. There are a lot more engineers appearing at the minute and you want to keep up because I guarantee they will be going for Chartership. Its all about the PE stamp. Engineers should help each other to make the world a safer and better place. I don't regret it for a second, but knowing what I know now, I would have probably done my BS in electrical or materials. After a few years in, I think your work experience makes all the difference rather than BS vs MS. When things get bad, people tough it out for awhile, then start considering grad school as a way to improve their situation in a bad economy, then finally take the plunge, but the degree takes 2+ years, and the economy changes before they get done.....and, well, it's a REALLY slow feedback loop that doesn't work very well.

I've done some research of jobs in the career field and many times i see that a master's is preferred but not absolutely necessary. Not everything is rules of thumb that can be repeated in practice.

No liquid can move through a pump, so only air pumps can be used for hygiene purposes.

However, I only got to know FPGAs during my Master's studies, so yeah, it has benefited.

That said, I have heard that starting in 2020 a masters will be required to sit for the PE exam.

The problem is, when the pump stops, some liquid doesn't flow out but gets stuck in troughs in the tubing and goes stale.

Here in Europe its very common for people to go to masters straight after their bachelors.

We are the only non-government/ military contractor in the US building our product at this scale.

Not to mention that for many positions there is no one at the company who could even teach you what you need to know, even if somehow the working world were conducive to such fundamentals.

Images related to engineering are accepted provided they are relevant to engineering.

A masters means nothing less. First of all, it seems to be next to impossible to enter the space industry in my country without a master's, and secondly, my master's and the conferences I attended during it allowed me the networking opportunities that didn't really exist during undergrad, which put me in contact with my current employer. How has your job benefited with you having a masters?

My undergrad was in Chemical, and my masters was in Nuclear. Now that I got it, I went back to increase my technical background.

Pick an engineer from the list of volunteers below and send him or her a PM indicating that you would like to conduct an interview: r/engineering is a forum for engineering professionals to share information, knowledge, experience related to the principles & practices of the numerous engineering disciplines.

I like my job because I get to work with so many different 3D printers, testing materials can go from stupid dull tensile tests to launching frozen chickens at stuff. They both had about a year of previous working history as an engineer since they graduated. Yup.

I absolutely will decide at the end of my BS, but i'm worried i may be unprepared when i get there. r/engineering is **NOT** for students to ask for guidance on selecting their major, or for homework / project help. Most of the engineers I work with have either BS or MS degrees, and I work at an R&D-oriented facility in my company.

Any inventive people here got some clever ideas? About 8 months later got a job with a major international corporation, working at one of their space & defense sites. I wanted to see where my career took me, what opportunities presented themselves before I decided to put efforts into a masters. Thanks for the response.

Both approaches work I guess.

Is it worth it?

), it is considered a lesser degree than Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.).

yup, had a job and was working the week after i finished my thesis. Read the sidebar BEFORE posting.

I would like some input on your ideas to maybe widen my perspective on this matter.

It does not require a research thesis.

Hopefully get a publication out of it as well. Earned substantially more to start than I could have ever earned as a design engineer or in junior management.

That's interesting, i'll take that into consideration. As for how the masters helped me (presumably you mean vs a bachelor's), I was hired on as a direct hire (not contract/temp-to-perm) with title of Engineer II and a pretty decent salary for the area (this with me having no engineering work experience other than research lab work and a few summer internships). I did my undergrad in Nuclear, but after the Fukushima accident in 2011 things weren't looking so hot.

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Many programs don't require you to write a thesis.

You get a masters if you want to learn more about a particular area/field personally. In Australia, the Master of Engineering degree is a research degree requiring completion of a thesis.Like the Master of Philosophy (M.Phil. I wouldn't have a job in my field if I hadn't done my master's. So that was a nice plus.

It deals more with developing your skills required for doing a job in that field. Half of the marks for my master's are based on a group project which is not only good experience but also reflects how an actual engineering project is carried out. In my master's year now.

Got a job working with composites and additive design on commercial airplanes.

If you are interested in pursuing a professional career in an engineering industry, definitely choose a university that has close ties with professionals currently working that industry.

For example, will I even have enough resources left, to continue?

When it comes to answering the question of whether or not an Masters in Engineering is worth it, the answer is generally “Yes.” Depending on the specifics, it may or may not give you a significant return on your investment financially.

Usually it is something like forensics or product design. r/engineering is a forum for engineering professionals to share information, knowledge, experience related to the principles & practices of the numerous engineering disciplines.

r/engineering is a forum for engineering professionals to share information, knowledge, experience related to the principles & practices of the numerous engineering disciplines. For me, getting my MS was a way to transition fields.

Other than that, I don't know.

After my masters I suddenly landed a buttload of interviews and a few offers. Press J to jump to the feed.

I work in a firm with over 100 technical staff doing electrical, controls systems, and industrial projects and I don't think a single one has a MS in engineering. So why hire someone, spend 2 years educating them with resources you don't have, when you could hire them for more from an accredited institution? By some measure, we are Ford before the assembly line and we have the first model T. The only downside is that I mainly work on the "factory floor", but I do get to take it out for a drive once and while, which is nice.

r/engineering is **NOT** for students to ask for guidance on selecting their major, or for homework / project help. I've been told time and time again that if you were to pursue this career, a bachelors is as far as you need to go as it is the most efficient route to take in life. The Masters of Science in Engineering degree is completed in three semesters and costs non-resident students $17,384.25 per semester (2019-2020).

Feeling quite good about it, doing a master allows me to learn the stuff I'm more interested in and which wasn't covered that much in my bachelors. TL;DR - It's probably not worth it.

I'm not sure pf the difference as far as career marketability, but an ME is typically a 'terminal degree' meaning there is no possibility of perusing a PhD after completion. It gets completed in a year. Questions about current engineering projects you are working on, how to interpret codes and standards, and industry practice are all encouraged. It's hard to hurt yourself with more degrees; however, you can narrow your versatility -- I've been told I'm over qualified for a job, which can be infuriating. Unless you want to go into teaching or directly into R&D (which is transitioning towards more MS degrees than PhDs in some fields), I wouldn't go to college expecting to go to graduate school. Even outside of true research. To me, thats very exhilarating.

Thanks for your input though.

Remember that typically a masters in engineering is good for mid career differentiation.

No pumps can be used at the TOP END, so the liquid has to be sucked out somehow really.

Yes, specialized in thermal and fluid science and then became a CFD Analyst, and had that job offer in the last semester of the MSME. Hmm, now that is an interesting word there, "prefer". An example of this can be practicing engineering professionals who are adjunct professors at the university or universities that invite specific engineering companies to recruit students. A masters is starting to be the norm for entry level Structural Engineering jobs. Having been in industry 6 years now (mechanical engineer), I feel like masters degree is roughly equal to a year of work experience. If you go to a good school, you will be in a class with some of the best future engineers in the world learning a deep understanding of engineering fundamentals.

I'm the one people look at when they model a piece decide we should make it with material A, I tell them if its even feasible.

That's a main point that has left me skeptical. Edit: I would just like to add, people have also stated that you can get years of work experience in the field as opposed to finishing your masters degree with no experience at all. r/engineering is **NOT** for students to ask for guidance on selecting their major, or for homework / project help. As for how the masters helped me (presumably you mean vs a bachelor's), I was hired on as a direct hire (not contract/temp-to-perm) with title of Engineer II and a pretty decent salary for the area (this with me having no engineering work experience other …

I spent 18 months delivering pizza after graduation. I'm a bit stumped really and don't know much hydraulics. How has your job benefited with you having a masters? That's my take.

I get to work with REALLY cool things and talk to lots of talented people. Definitely evaluate your options at the end of your BS, and move on from there.

On the flip side, the job offer I got and took was for a level II position when someone entering with bachelors starts at a level I position and has to wait 4 years to move up. I wasn't sure where I would end up so I waited until I got the job I desired in structural engineering. Studied Aerospace, ended up in Automotive. Tl;dr Master's gives you more flexibility in your career choices, provides valuable experience and makes you stand out in the application process. When I started in my most recent job there hadn't been any CFD performed, and nobody there who had knowledge of the field. Having no work experience is a bitch, Master's or no. It's almost necessary for BME and helped me a lot, but I think good internship experience was more valuable. Some companies might up the pay a little or lower the experience requirement but you would have gotten further in your career just getting the bachelors. We had MS holders who would occasionally be able to talk their way into an Engineer 2 position (starting), rather than an E1 position, but there were also MS holders who started as E1. I believe engineer firms are most interested in highering young engineers for their engineering input developed from there undergraduate and graduate programs along with their ability to be trained as future professionals in the industry. So those are the problems i'm finding for myself. BS in Civil Engineering, MS in Structural Engineering, and now working at a Structural Engineering firm. I think a major point is being missed here.

Let's put aside the knowledge side of thing for now but I agree you will learn more in industry then another year in Uni. While I also am a little older, and have a really solid resume, I think it's fair to say a lot of the difference can be ascribed to my graduate degree. It is a lot more complicated if you do not.

r/engineering is **NOT** for students to ask for guidance on selecting their major, or for homework / project help. There are a lot more engineers appearing at the minute and you want to keep up because I guarantee they will be going for Chartership. Its all about the PE stamp. Engineers should help each other to make the world a safer and better place. I don't regret it for a second, but knowing what I know now, I would have probably done my BS in electrical or materials. After a few years in, I think your work experience makes all the difference rather than BS vs MS. When things get bad, people tough it out for awhile, then start considering grad school as a way to improve their situation in a bad economy, then finally take the plunge, but the degree takes 2+ years, and the economy changes before they get done.....and, well, it's a REALLY slow feedback loop that doesn't work very well.

I've done some research of jobs in the career field and many times i see that a master's is preferred but not absolutely necessary. Not everything is rules of thumb that can be repeated in practice.

No liquid can move through a pump, so only air pumps can be used for hygiene purposes.

However, I only got to know FPGAs during my Master's studies, so yeah, it has benefited.

That said, I have heard that starting in 2020 a masters will be required to sit for the PE exam.

The problem is, when the pump stops, some liquid doesn't flow out but gets stuck in troughs in the tubing and goes stale.

Here in Europe its very common for people to go to masters straight after their bachelors.

We are the only non-government/ military contractor in the US building our product at this scale.

Not to mention that for many positions there is no one at the company who could even teach you what you need to know, even if somehow the working world were conducive to such fundamentals.

Images related to engineering are accepted provided they are relevant to engineering.

A masters means nothing less. First of all, it seems to be next to impossible to enter the space industry in my country without a master's, and secondly, my master's and the conferences I attended during it allowed me the networking opportunities that didn't really exist during undergrad, which put me in contact with my current employer. How has your job benefited with you having a masters?

My undergrad was in Chemical, and my masters was in Nuclear. Now that I got it, I went back to increase my technical background.

Pick an engineer from the list of volunteers below and send him or her a PM indicating that you would like to conduct an interview: r/engineering is a forum for engineering professionals to share information, knowledge, experience related to the principles & practices of the numerous engineering disciplines.

I like my job because I get to work with so many different 3D printers, testing materials can go from stupid dull tensile tests to launching frozen chickens at stuff. They both had about a year of previous working history as an engineer since they graduated. Yup.

I absolutely will decide at the end of my BS, but i'm worried i may be unprepared when i get there. r/engineering is **NOT** for students to ask for guidance on selecting their major, or for homework / project help. Most of the engineers I work with have either BS or MS degrees, and I work at an R&D-oriented facility in my company.

Any inventive people here got some clever ideas? About 8 months later got a job with a major international corporation, working at one of their space & defense sites. I wanted to see where my career took me, what opportunities presented themselves before I decided to put efforts into a masters. Thanks for the response.

Both approaches work I guess.

Is it worth it?

), it is considered a lesser degree than Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.).

yup, had a job and was working the week after i finished my thesis. Read the sidebar BEFORE posting.

I would like some input on your ideas to maybe widen my perspective on this matter.

It does not require a research thesis.

Hopefully get a publication out of it as well. Earned substantially more to start than I could have ever earned as a design engineer or in junior management.

That's interesting, i'll take that into consideration. As for how the masters helped me (presumably you mean vs a bachelor's), I was hired on as a direct hire (not contract/temp-to-perm) with title of Engineer II and a pretty decent salary for the area (this with me having no engineering work experience other than research lab work and a few summer internships). I did my undergrad in Nuclear, but after the Fukushima accident in 2011 things weren't looking so hot.

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